Projects & Impact

AHP has built its business on applying best practices, many of which we have helped to shape, and real-world, hands-on knowledge to improving systems and business practices for our clients.

In all of the work that we do, we are guided by our mission to improve health and human services systems of care and business operations to help organizations and individuals reach their full potential.

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Access to Recovery (ATR) [Commonwealth of Massachusetts, DPH/BSAS]

ATR is an innovative program that helps people in Massachusetts who are in early recovery from opioid use disorder (OUD) gain wider access to community services. ATR is making a difference, shown by a four-fold increase in employment among participants after they complete the program compared to when they enrolled. ATR graduates are better able to sustain recovery, find jobs, and maintain stable housing. 
 

ATR participants are also far less likely to fatally overdose while enrolled in the program, with rates at less than 1%.   

 

AHP has been running this federal grant from SAMHSA since 2010. Clients choose recovery support services that they think will help them most in their recovery.  
 

Examples of services include care coordination, basic critical needs support (clothing, IDs), public transportation passes, health and mental health supports, and employment training. ATR gives participants the dignity of self-sufficiency and the hope for a future in recovery.  

 

This project is being implemented in four Massachusetts cities: Springfield, Boston, Worcester, and New Bedford.  

  

For the relatively low cost of an average of $1,865 per participant for the 6-month program, ATR saves the Commonwealth money and saves lives. During one grant year alone, $4 million went back into the local economy by paying providers for the services provided to participants and by paying participants a work-study benefit when they attended job-training programs. 

 

The focus on employment through job readiness training, job search assistance, and occupational training is key to the program’s success. Job training is provided to participants with a recognition that they have complex needs and benefit from customized approaches to employment training. The ATR employment program, the Career Building Initiative (CBI), is a national model for successful job readiness and occupational training for people in early recovery from substance use disorders. 
 

About 90% of ATR participants have some criminal justice system involvement and often face barriers to securing employment. To accommodate this population, CBI includes training in jobs that employ people with a criminal justice background, including culinary/food services, commercial cleaning, construction, hotel/hospitality, truck driving, and office work. 

 

ATR coordinators are continuously trained on recovery planning, motivational interviewing, and engagement techniques, resulting in successful engagement with the participants throughout their time in the program. 

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